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Cryptic female choice

Publications filtered by: Cryptic female choice

The total opportunity for sexual selection and the integration of pre- and post-mating episodes of sexual selection in a complex world
Evans, J. P. & Garcia-Gonzalez, F. 2016 The total opportunity for sexual selection and the integration of pre- and post-mating episodes of sexual selection in a complex world Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 29: 2338-2361
Abstract

It is well known that sexual selection can target reproductive traits during successive pre- and post-mating episodes of selection. A key focus of recent studies has been to understand and quantify how these episodes of sexual selection interact to determine overall variance in reproductive success. In this paper we review empirical developments in this field but also highlight the considerable variability in patterns of pre- and post-mating sexual selection, attributable to variation in patterns of resource acquisition and allocation, ecological and social factors, genotype-by-environment interaction, and possible methodological factors that might obscure such patterns. Our aim is to highlight how (co)variances in pre- and post-mating sexually selected traits can be sensitive to changes in a range of ecological and environmental variables. We argue that failure to capture this variation when quantifying the opportunity for sexual selection may lead to erroneous conclusions about the strength, direction or form of sexual selection operating on pre- and post-mating traits. Overall, we advocate for approaches that combine measures of pre- and post-mating selection across contrasting environmental or ecological gradients to better understand the dynamics of sexual selection in polyandrous species. We also discuss some directions for future research in this area.

Additive genetic variance in polyandry enables its evolution but polyandry is unlikely to evolve through sexy or good sperm processes
Travers, L. M., Simmons, L. W. & Garcia-Gonzalez, F. 2016 Additive genetic variance in polyandry enables its evolution but polyandry is unlikely to evolve through sexy or good sperm processes Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 29: 916-928.
Abstract

Polyandry is widespread despite its costs. The sexually selected sperm hypotheses (‘sexy’ and ‘good’ sperm) posit that sperm competition plays a role in the evolution of polyandry. Two poorly studied assumptions of these hypotheses are the presence of additive genetic variance in polyandry and sperm competitiveness. Using a quantitative genetic breeding design in a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster, we first established the potential for polyandry to respond to selection. We then investigated whether polyandry can evolve through sexually selected sperm processes. We measured lifetime polyandry and offensive sperm competitiveness (P2) while controlling for sampling variance due to male x male x female interactions. We also measured additive genetic variance in egg-to-adult viability and controlled for its effect on P2 estimates. Female lifetime polyandry showed significant and substantial additive genetic variance and evolvability. In contrast, we found little genetic variance or evolvability in P2 or egg-to-adult viability. Additive genetic variance in polyandry highlights its potential to respond to selection. However, the low levels of genetic variance in sperm competitiveness suggest the evolution of polyandry may not be driven by sexy sperm or good sperm processes.

Patterns of paternity skew among polyandrous social insects: What can they tell us about the potential for sexual selection?
Jaffé, R., F. Garcia-Gonzalez, S. P. A. den Boer, L. W. Simmons, & B. Baer. 2012 Patterns of paternity skew among polyandrous social insects: What can they tell us about the potential for sexual selection? Evolution, 66:3778-3788
Abstract

Monogamy results in high genetic relatedness among offspring and thus it is generally assumed to be favored by kin selection. Female multiple mating (polyandry) has nevertheless evolved several times in the social Hymenoptera (ants, bees, and wasps), and a substantial amount of work has been conducted to understand its costs and benefits. Relatedness and inclusive fitness benefits are, however, not only influenced by queen mating frequency but also by paternity skew, which is a quantitative measure of paternity biases among the offspring of polyandrous females.We performed a large-scale phylogenetic analysis of paternity skew across polyandrous social Hymenoptera. We found a general and significant negative association between paternity frequency and paternity skew. High paternity skew, which increases relatedness among colony members and thus maximizes inclusive fitness gains, characterized species with low paternity frequency. However, species with highly polyandrous queens had low paternity skew, with paternity equalized among potential sires. Equal paternity shares among fathers are expected to maximize fitness benefits derived from genetic diversity among offspring. We discuss the potential for postcopulatory sexual selection to influence patterns of paternity in social insects, and suggest that sexual selection may have played a key, yet overlooked role in social evolution.

Assessing the potential for egg chemoattractants to mediate sexual selection in a broadcast spawning marine invertebrate
Evans, J. P., F. Garcia-Gonzalez, M. Almbro, O. Robinson, & J. L. Fitzpatrick. 2012 Assessing the potential for egg chemoattractants to mediate sexual selection in a broadcast spawning marine invertebrate Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, 279:2855-2861
Abstract

In numerous species, egg chemoattractants play a critical role in guiding sperm towards unfertilized eggs (sperm chemotaxis). Until now the known functions of sperm chemotaxis include increasing the effective target size of eggs, thereby promoting sperm-egg encounters, and facilitating species recognition. Here we report that in the broadcast spawning mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis egg chemoattractants may play an unforeseen role in sexual selection by enabling sperm to effectively ‘choose’ between the eggs of different conspecific females. In an initial experiment we confirmed that sperm chemotaxis occurs in M. galloprovincialis by showing that sperm are attracted towards unfertilized eggs when given the choice of eggs or no eggs in a dichotomous chamber. We then conducted two cross-classified mating experiments, each comprising the same individual males and females crossed in identical male x female combinations but under experimental conditions that offered sperm ‘no-choice’ (each fertilization trial took place in a petri dish and involved a single male and female) or a ‘choice’ of a female’s eggs (sperm were placed in the centre of a dichotomous choice chamber and allowed to choose eggs from different females). We show that male-by-female interactions characterized fertilization rates in both experiments, and that there was remarkable consistency between patterns of sperm migration in the egg choice experiment and fertilization rates in the no-choice experiment. These results reveal that sperm differentially select eggs on the basis of chemical cues, thus exposing the potential for egg chemoattractants to mediate mate choice for genetically compatible partners. Given the prevalence of sperm chemotaxis across diverse taxa, our findings may have broad implications for sexual selection in other mating systems.