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Golden egg bug

Publications filtered by: Golden egg bug

Gomendio, M., Garcia-Gonzalez, F., Reguera, P. & Rivero A. 2008 Male egg-carrying in Phyllomorpha laciniata is favoured by natural not sexual selection Animal Behaviour, 75:763-770
Abstract

Two hypotheses could explain the evolution of paternal care: caring males are more attractive to females and mate more often (sexual selection); males care when the benefits in terms of offspring survival exceed the costs (natural selection). To test these hypotheses we used Phyllomorpha laciniata: females can choose whether to lay eggs on plants or on conspecifics, and the extent to which males carry eggs varies between populations. Our results do not support the sexual selection hypothesis: females did not choose to mate with egg-carrying males in either natural populations or experimental contexts. We compared two populations that differ in the extent of male egg carrying and we show that in the population where male egg carrying was more prevalent, parasitism pressure was higher. Field experiments revealed that, in the population with high parasitism rate, egg mortality as a result of parasitoid attack was up to 10 times higher on plants than on conspecifics. Egg carrying is thus an effective strategy that protects eggs against parasitoids. We conclude that the main benefit derived by males from egg carrying is an increase in offspring survival, and that males are sensitive to interpopulation differences in egg mortality risks. Male care in this system has evolved despite intermediate levels of paternity certainty because the impact on offspring survival is high, and the costs in terms of loss of mating opportunities low. Thus, our findings support the natural selection hypothesis, although additional work on more populations is needed to verify this.

Paternity analysis in the golden egg bug using AFLPs: do the males preferentially accept their true genetic offspring?
Garcia-Gonzalez, F., Núñez, Y., Ponz, F., Roldán, E. R. S., & Gomendio, M. 2005 Paternity analysis in the golden egg bug using AFLPs: do the males preferentially accept their true genetic offspring? Ecological Entomology, 30: 444-455
Abstract

1. The evolution of parental care and intraspecific parasitism involve conflicts of interest between mothers and other potential care givers who contribute to enhance offspring survival. In the golden egg bug, Phyllomorpha laciniata Villers (Heteroptera: Coreidae), females lay eggs on conspecifics and on plants. The adaptive significance of egg carrying in this species has been the subject of some controversy, which can only be resolved by determining the genetic relationship between the eggs and the adult who carries them. This study examined whether male acceptance of true genetic offspring occurs with a higher frequency than that expected from random oviposition on conspecifics. 2. Paternity analysis, using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers, was conducted on eggs carried by males housed with field-mated females. 3. Out of the total number of eggs sired by males in the experimental groups, the proportion of eggs carried by males that were their true genetic offspring was 30.8%. 4. Monte Carlo methods show that the probability of a male accepting an egg that is his true genetic offspring is higher than expected if females dumped eggs on males at random. 5. These results suggest that paternal care plays an important role in the maintenance of male egg carrying in this species. In addition, the methodology developed may become useful in determining true genetic parents in other species in which neither the father nor the mother can be determined by observational methods.

Adjustment of copula duration and ejaculate size according to the risk of sperm competition in the golden egg bug (Phyllomorpha laciniata)
Garcia-Gonzalez, F. and Gomendio, M. 2004 Adjustment of copula duration and ejaculate size according to the risk of sperm competition in the golden egg bug (Phyllomorpha laciniata) Behavioral Ecology, 15:23-30
Abstract
Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the adaptive significance of prolonged copulations in insects, which include mate guarding and sperm loading functions. We have explored the adaptive significance of the prolonged copulations in the golden egg bug (copulations up to 50 h) and the effect of an increased risk of sperm competition on ejaculate investment. Our data support predictions derived from sperm competition theory, which posits that males are expected to increase ejaculate expenditure in response to an increased risk of sperm competition. Results show a combined response by males that has not been previously described: males in the presence of rivals increase copulation duration and the rate of sperm transfer. No relationship was found between male or female size and copulation duration or ejaculate size. Golden egg bug males transfer sperm slowly and gradually throughout copulation; thus an increase in the amount of sperm transferred and the corresponding increase in the male’s numerical representation in the female’s storage organs could be particularly important in a system in which so few sperm are transferred and in which so few sperm are stored by females. In addition, copulation duration may not only serve to increase the total amount of sperm transferred, but it may also increase the chances that the female will lay an egg soon after copulation has ended. This could explain why males tend to accept eggs after copulation, since they could be maximizing the chances that such eggs are fathered by them, and in this way they would substantially increase the survival rates of their offspring because eggs laid on plants suffer high mortality rates.
A field test of the intraspecific brood parasitism hypothesis in the golden egg bug (Phyllormorpha laciniata)
Garcia-Gonzalez, F. and Gomendio, M. 2003 A field test of the intraspecific brood parasitism hypothesis in the golden egg bug (Phyllormorpha laciniata) Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 53:332-339
Abstract

In natural populations of golden egg bugs (Phyllomorpha laciniata), females lay eggs on plants where they develop unattended, or on conspecifics, where they remain firmly glued until the nymphs hatch and start an independent life. Mortality rates among eggs laid on plants are higher than among eggs carried by adults. Because females cannot lay eggs on themselves, in order to improve offspring survival, they have to lay eggs on other individuals. Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain egg carrying: (1) the mating pair intraspecific brood parasitism hypothesis suggests that females dump eggs on copulating pairs, and (2) the paternal care hypothesis suggests that the system is driven mainly by males accepting eggs to improve the survival rates of their own offspring. Our data from the field show that 77% of the eggs are carried by males, because more males than females carry eggs, and because males carry a greater number of eggs. In addition, we show that mating males carry more recently laid eggs than single males. These results support the view that egg carrying is performed predominantly by males and that eggs are laid on males by their current mating partner, probably between repeated copulations. Males are likely to accept eggs, despite intermediate levels of paternity, because they cannot discriminate in favour of their own eggs, because rejected eggs will face 97% mortality rates on plants, and because they do not suffer mating costs when they carry eggs. However, females carry 23% of the eggs, but no differences in egg carrying have been found between mating and single females, suggesting that this is not the result of egg dumping while females are copulating. Egg carrying by females could reflect low levels of intraspecific parasitism, which is likely to reflect the low rate of successful attempts by egg-laying females who try to oviposit on other conspecifics rather indiscriminately, in an effort to improve the survival of their offspring.

The evolution of egg carrying in Phyllomorpha laciniata (Het., Coreidae): a behavioural, physiological and molecular approach to explain its adaptive significance in males and females
Garcia-Gonzalez, F. & Ornosa, C. 2002 The evolution of egg carrying in Phyllomorpha laciniata (Het., Coreidae): a behavioural, physiological and molecular approach to explain its adaptive significance in males and females PhD Thesis, Complutense University of Madrid