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paco.garcia[at]ebd.csic.es

Transgenerational effects

Publications filtered by: Transgenerational effects

Sources of genetic and phenotypic variance in sperm performance and larval traits in a sea urchin
Evans, J. P., Garcia-Gonzalez, F. & Marshall, D. J. 2007 Sources of genetic and phenotypic variance in sperm performance and larval traits in a sea urchin Evolution, 61: 2832-2838
Abstract
In nonresource based mating systems females are thought to derive indirect genetic benefits by mating with high-quality males. Such benefits can be due either to the intrinsic genetic quality of sires or to beneficial interactions between maternal and paternal haplotypes. Animals with external fertilization and no parental care offer unrivaled opportunities to address these hypotheses. With these systems, cross-classified breeding designs and in vitro fertilization can be used to disentangle sources of genetic and environmental variance in offspring fitness. Here, we employ these approaches in the Australian sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma and explore how sire–dam identities influence fertilization rates, embryo viability (survival to hatching), and metamorphosis, as well as the interrelationships between these potential fitness traits. We show that fertilization is influenced by a combination of strong maternal effects and intrinsic male effects. Our subsequent analysis of embryo viability, however, revealed a highly significant interaction between parental genotypes, indicating that partial incompatibilities can severely limit offspring survival at this life-history stage. Importantly, we detected no significant relationship between fertilization rates and embryo viability. This finding suggests that fertilization rates should not be inferred from hatching rates, which is commonly practiced in species in which it is not possible to estimate fertilization at conception. Finally, we detected significant additive genetic variance due to sires in rates of juvenile metamorphosis, and a positive correlation between fertilization rates and metamorphosis. This latter finding indicates that the performance of a male’s ejaculate in noncompetitive IVF trials predicts heritable offspring traits, although the fitness implications of variance in rates of spontaneous juvenile metamorphosis have yet to be determined.
The evolution of polyandry: intrinsic sire effects contribute to embryo viability
Garcia-Gonzalez, F. & Simmons, L. W. 2005 The evolution of polyandry: intrinsic sire effects contribute to embryo viability Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 18:1097-1103
Abstract
Females typically mate with more than one male despite the costs incurred, thus questioning Bateman’s principle. A series of genetic benefits have been proposed to account for the evolution of polyandry, including the acquisition of viability genes for offspring. The ‘intrinsic male quality’ hypothesis suggests that polyandry increases the probability that females produce offspring sired by males that bestow high viability on their offspring. Heritable variation in viability is the basic requirement for the occurrence of this genetic benefit. By using a half-sib breeding design with a species of cricket in which polyandry is known to increase hatching success, we present clear experimental evidence that intrinsic male quality contributes to embryo viability. Despite recent support for the evolution of polyandry based on compatibility of genotypes between males and females, we show that hatching success is not determined by an interaction between paternal and maternal genotypes but rather that sons inherit paternal genes that influence the viability of eggs laid by their mates. Moreover, our data implicate a potential role for indirect genetic effects of male accessory gland products on embryo viability. Additive genetic contributions to embryo viability may be an important factor underlying the frequently observed benefits of polyandrous behaviour.
Maternal sexual interactions affect offspring survival and ageing
Dowling, D. K., Williams, B. R., and Garcia-Gonzalez, F. 2014 Maternal sexual interactions affect offspring survival and ageing Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 27: 88-97
Abstract

In many species, females exposed to increased sexual activity experience reductions in longevity. Here, in Drosophila melanogaster, we report an additional effect on females brought about by sexual interactions; an effect that spans generations. We subjected females to a sexual treatment consisting of different levels of sexual activity, and then investigated patterns of mortality in their offspring. We found reduced probabilities of survival, increases in the rate-of-senescence, and a pattern of reduced mean longevities, for offspring produced by mothers that experienced higher levels of sexual interaction. We contend that these effects constitute trans-generational costs of sexual conflict – the existence or implications of which have rarely been considered previously. Our results indicate that ongoing exposure by mothers to male pre-copulatory interactions is itself sufficient to drive trans-generational effects on offspring mortality. Thus, we show that increases in maternal sexual activity can produce trans-generational effects that permeate through to latter life-stages in the offspring. This helps to elucidate the complex interplay between sex and ageing, and provides new insights into the dynamics of adaptation under sexual selection.

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